Sound recordings played forward

ACHIEVING SUSTAINABILITY OF SOUND RECORDINGS IN A TIME OF RAPID TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE IS A DAUNTING CHALLENGE.

However, the Australasian Sound Recordings Association (ASRA) recently held its 2015 national conference in Sydney with a great deal of member and institutional support.

The conference “Play it Forward: Sustainability in a Time of Rapid Change” was held from 18 – 20 November 2015 at the State Library of New South Wales in Macquarie Street, Sydney.

The preliminary program is provided online by ASRA at http://asra.asn.au/downloads/conference_2015_preliminary_program.pdf

The conference was coordinated by ASRA in association with the Australian Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Material (AICCM)’s Digital and Audiovisual Heritage Special Interest Group.

Photograph copyright by the Australasian Sound Recordings Association 2014
Kevin Bradley, past president of ASRA (Australasian Sound Recordings Association).

Kevin Bradley of the National Library of Australia (NLA) was listed to present on Thursday 19 November in the Metcalfe Auditorium of the State Library of New South Wales. His topic was titled ‘New Technology, New-Old Issues: Adventures in Creating, Using, Delivering and Archiving a Digital Oral History Collection’.

Kevin is a past president of ASRA and a regular presenter at ASRA national conferences. His presentation at the 2014 conference at the NLA in Canberra last year ended with receipt of wine and accolades.

The national journal of ASRA is the Australasian Sound Archive. A recent article by Kevin Bradley is in the 40th edition of The Australasian Sound Archive is listed at pages 22-23 (see http://asra.asn.au/journal_table_of_contents/asa_no40_2015.htm).

Background to Australasian Sound Recordings Association (ASRA):

ASRA was formed in 1987 for those working in recorded sounds and sound history. The Association supports members’ involvement in collecting, archiving and preservation of sound recordings. This includes the technical considerations and historical context of sound recordings. Caring for the collections is a critical matter for sound historians and curators.

Its membership includes radio broadcasters, journalists, professional sound archivists, and curators, recording engineers, oral and social historians, sound artists, preservation specialists, researchers and private collectors. Membership is also available to people and institutions with an interest in sound recording history and its development.

The Association shares links with the International Association of Sound & Audio Visual Archives (IASA) and the Association for Recorded Sound Collections (ARSC) in America.

Institutional Members of ASRA (A-Z listing):

  • AFAE (Australian Forum for Acoustic Ecology)
  • AIATSIS (Australian Institute for Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Studies)
  • Alexander Turnbull Library (New Zealand)
  • National Archives of Australia (formally Australian Archives)
  • Australian Broadcasting Corporation (Radio Archives)
  • Australian War Memorial Library (Queensland)
  • BMG Arista/Ariola International (Technical Services, Sydney)
  • Conservation Commission of the Northern Territory
  • CSIRO Corporate Library & Information Service
  • Library Board of Western Australia
  • Library of Congress (Exchange Division)
  • Monash University, (Music Library)
  • National Archives of Malaysia
  • NLA (National Library of Australia)
  • National Library of New Zealand
  • National Museum of Australia
  • National Research Institute (Papua & New Guinea)
  • Performing Arts Collection of South Australia
  • Performing Arts Museum (Victoria)
  • Radio New Zealand
  • Royal Blind Society (Audio Production Unit)
  • NFSA (National Film & Sound Archive)
  • Sound Archives/Nga Taonga Korero
  • State Library of New South Wales
  • State Library of Victoria
  • State Library of South Australia (Somerville Collection)
  • University of Western Sydney (Nepean/Kingswood Campus).

Membership applications and subscriptions are available on the ASRA website: http://asra.asn.au.
Details on the Australian Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Material are available at https://aiccm.org.au/.

Photograph and most of the text courtesy of ASRA.
Uploaded 26 November 2015