AFP pursuit cars roving this holiday season.

AFP pursuit cars roving this holiday season.

AFP VEHICLES ARE ON THE ROAD THIS HOLIDAY SEASON TO MONITOR AND DETER ROAD ACCIDENTS.

The AFP, also known as the Australian Federal Police, has a range of motor cars to monitor traffic behaviour each holiday season in an effort to promote safer driving practices.

AFP

Exhibition poster at NMA.

The range of police motor vehicles on the road are sometimes known as ‘wolves in sheep’s clothing’, according to the latest museum exhibit at the National Museum of Australia (NMA). The cars look like an ordinary passenger vehicle but have mega-engines under the hood for emergency needs.

One example currently on show at the NMA is the 1974 model Ford Falcon XB pursuit car. It was produced at the Ford factory in Broadmeadows in Victoria in September 1974. The vehicle was modified by for police use with a powerful V8 motor “beefed-up” suspension and heavy brakes.

The exhibition signage says “having such a powerful V8 pursuit motor with GT modifications inside a standard Falcon body led to its description as a ‘wolf in sheep’s clothing’.”

AFP

AFP pursuit car at NMA.

The pursuit car is a 4-speed fully synchronized manual with 300 bhp at 5400 rpm. The speed take-up is listed as 0-60 miles per hour in 74 seconds.

The ACT Police additions include:

. ACT Police badge decals on doors.

. Blue flashing light on centre roof.

. Radio antenna fitted to roof.

. Siren horns, on a bumper-mounted bracket.

. Second speedometer in the glove compartment calibrated to 220 kilometres per hour.

AFP

AFP ACT Police badge decal

. AWA radio in cabin.

AFP

Exhibition panel photo of car interior

. Carphone radio in boot.

. External bonnet catches.

. Driving lights on the grille.

. Aftermarket rear window demister.

. Fire extinguisher in boot.

AFP

The AFP pursuit vehicle on display.

The exhibition signage says the “power and performance of this car made it ideal for patrolling the ACT’s main arterial roads and highways.”

The vehicle was “used for speed detection and high speed pursuits.” It was also used for ceremonial duties as a pilot, security or sweep vehicle in VIP escorts.”

The second speedometer in the glove compartment was read by the driver’s partner (sometimes called the ‘navigator’), to gain a true speed reading of a suspect vehicle.

AFP

The car’s front end with ‘Museum’ number plate.

AFP

Rear end of the AFP pursuit vehicle.

 

 

 

 


Even though good driving skills are required to be a patrol vehicle driver, “only the most experienced motorcyclists became pursuit car drivers”.

Text copyright by Fiona Rothchilds and AFP/NMA.
Photographs copyright Fiona Rothchilds 2017.
Uploaded 18 December 2017.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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